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    Anatomy of body alignment and balance.

    Taping
    Body alignment and balance comes when our midline anatomy can be arranged on the median plane. This is possible when the body has a full range of natural movement and our midline anatomy can achieve full extension.

    The linea alba and nuchal & supraspinous ligaments are linear structures on the body's midline that should be felt to be in alignment (with the sense of conscious proprioception), this comes by connecting with the muscles either side - namely the rectus abdominis and trapezius muscles.

    Work towards balance and alignment by focusing on the '5 main muscles of movement', starting with the Base-Line muscles: pelvic floor 'Base' rectus abdominis 'Line'. The body's core pillar of strength and key muscles to focus on for better health. Think stronger and longer with every in-breathe.

    The gluteus maximus and rectus femoris muscles of each leg should work in tandem to link the legs to Base-Line support. The rectus femoris like a strong pole down the front of the thigh aligning hip and knee joints,

    The trapezius muscles like a blanket of muscle that should be smooth and wrinkle free, from mid-back to the back of the head, shoulder to shoulder supporting the head and arms.

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    Re: Anatomy of body alignment and balance.

    good-posture-main-muscles-rectus-abdominis-femoris-trapezius-linea-alba-nuchal-supraspinous-liga.jpg

    Pelvic floor muscles (not labelled) at the base of the body and the rectus abdominis muscles either side of the linea alba are our "Base-Line" muscles - the body's "core pillar of strength" when fully activated and elongated. Think of all movement of the rest of the body originating from Base-Line. Work on breathing with your Base-Line. Build the connection between muscles and mind.

    The rectus femoris muscles - like strong poles down the front of each thigh from hip bone to shin, aligning the hip and knee joints. (The only one of the quadriceps that attaches to the pelvis, the rectus femoris correctly positions the legs to the torso when fully activated allowing the other muscles to work as they should.)
    The gluteus maximus muscles (not labelled) work in tandem with the rectus femoris to support the legs through a full range of natural movement.

    The trapezius muscles align the upper body and guide the head and arms through a full range of movement when they are free of physical restrictions. The nuchal ligament between the trapezius muscles should be easily palpable, but often it is not due to physical restrictions in the connective tissues of the upper body.

    These 5 (paired) muscles are the ones to focus on using in order to feel how to move to improve posture and work towards a more dynamically balanced and aligned body.

    Picture these muscles in your mind, feel for them activating. Develop your sense of conscious proprioception and feel how to heal.


  3. The Following User Says Thank You to LeighBlyth For This Useful Post:

    Anatomy of body alignment and balance.

    Jimmy12345 (26-08-2021)

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    Lightbulb Re: Anatomy of body alignment and balance.

    Nearly 3000 views but no comments. I'm not sure what to make of that. Lots of people looking once, fewer people looking more often? The anatomy of alignment dismissed or considered?

    I would appreciate feedback - all comments, criticisms, thoughts are welcome.

    Images are clearer than (my) words so here's a few:
    (I've not managed to figure out how to resize them so sorry if they appear too big.)

    The linea alba - Midline anatomy between the rectus abdominis muscles.





    The nuchal and supraspinous ligaments - Midline anatomy, where the left and right trapezius meet.




    Our midline anatomy should be able to align on the median plane, so the body is balanced either side.



    This is possible when our midline structures are feel to fully extend, where the body has a full range of natural movement and is free of physical restrictions.



  5. The Following User Says Thank You to LeighBlyth For This Useful Post:

    Anatomy of body alignment and balance.

    Jimmy12345 (26-08-2021)

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    Re: Anatomy of body alignment and balance.

    Thank you for sharing this information!


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    Re: Anatomy of body alignment and balance.

    Must have Kinesiology Taping DVD
    Thank you for reading!

    Using our midline anatomy as the reference for body alignment and balance seems obvious. (there's far to much focus on the spine and joints IMHO - it's muscles and connective tissues that position our bones, that create and alter our posture).

    If the linea alba and nuchal and supraspinous ligaments can be aligned on the median plane the body is balanced. The body needs a full range of natural movement in order to achieve this and not many people have that! Physical restrictions in connective tissues (as a response to to trauma, stress, inflammation etc.) reduce range of movement and cause misalignment and imbalance = pain and tensions, body-wide effects over time. Stored trauma on the body, that can be released by focusing on using the right muscles to work towards alignment and balance.




 
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