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  1. #1
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    Studying PT in Canada, as a German

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    Hey there,

    My name is Jonas, im from Germany.
    I will finish school in spring 2015, graduating with the german "Abitur".


    I would like to study Physiotherapy, starting in winter semester probably, in Canada
    I dont know much about studying Physiotherapy in foreign countries, since physio training in Germany is very different: Usually, theyre just trained, they dont study it.
    From what ive heard so far, canadian physiotherapy schools arent the worst in the world, although the best education of this profession may exist in Australia.
    -what do you think? Which countries are really the leading ones, and what about Canada really?


    Then, again, im wondering : which are the BEST physio schools in canada?
    What are the specific requirements for studying Physiotherapy in Canada?
    Is my high school degree, the Abitur, enough?


    Please tell me something about the requirements, and how to apply as an international student, i didnt found anything comprehensive in the net.
    If you could provide me with some starting info that would be quite nice.


    Jonas, from Germany

    Similar Threads:
    Last edited by StudentDoctorHohmann; 31-07-2014 at 11:08 PM. Reason: Mistakes

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    Re: Studying PT in Canada, as a German

    Hi Jonas,
    my first question would be: why would you want to study Physio when this degree won't be recognised in your own country?
    Are you actually thinking of emigration? You should study in the country you would like to live in.

    I think the Physio degrees of Canada, Australia, New Zealand, England, Scotland, Ireland, South Africa and Hong Kong and the Netherlands are of equally excellent quality. The difference will mainly be the number of years at uni (e.g. 3 yrs vs. 4 yrs).
    My opinion is based on the fact that I have worked with people who got their degrees in those countries (I think I have listed them all) who got registration in New Zealand, where we do have a 4 yr BSc.

    In regards to Canada. Why don't you check the website of the Physio Association of Canda:Physiotherapy Education - Canadian Physiotherapy Association
    And here is something for prerequisites: Physiotherapy Admission Requirements for Canadian Universities
    Looks like you need 'B' levels in English, maths, physics, chemistry and biology.

    You might need to contact each university to check on the requirements for enrolment. And it pays to check with immigration department to check for visa requirements as well.
    And don't forget to look at the fee structure. In NZ, e.g. there is no government subsidy for foreigners, so you would need to pay about NZ$30.000 per year (= about 19000 Euro).

    Good luck,
    Fyzzio


  3. #3
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    Re: Studying PT in Canada, as a German

    Hey Fyzzio,
    thanks for your reply.

    1.how are you that sure that that degree wont be recognised in my country?
    if you base that assumption on my own words ( "since physio training in Germany is very different: Usually, theyre just trained, they dont study it." ) i have to add that there is the possibility to study it in Germany as well. Its just a very recent innovation, i think you can also only study it an 1 or 2 unis in Germany. So why shouldnt it be recognised?
    If you, on the other side, base that assumption on own investigation or experience, please give me some references!
    2. Im not thinking of immigration. I much rather would like to take Physiotherapy course as a kind of pre-study. My ultimate goal is to study medicine in germany after this. If i study abroad, the semesters i dont study in Germany can be accredited as "waiting semesters" , which increase my chance of studying place my a multiple factor.
    By no means am i taking physiotherapy as an inferior education of health sciences. In fact, if i would actually emigrate to canada for my whole length of life, i would probably stop education after the physio course. Just, in germany, salarys for physios are very very bad, hence i would like to combine both professions, physio and medicine, the result will be a higher salary, but also an holistic approach to injuries in sports or life, as i would like to work in the sports/ orthopaedic fied later.

    That physio course in canada would bring me a whole lotta advantages: Preparing for medical school, get to know techniques and approaches that arent covered in medical school - hence a complementary education, directed towards the goal of an holistic treatment of my patients in future, manybe also that title of " master of physiotherapy " could make good as an additional title, hence possible higher reputation, also i would like to intensify english skills, then the deep interest into Canada, sccompagmied by the goal to live there for a time in my life.
    Basically, i would like to bridge that time span between school and my med. course in Germany, in a senseful way, with a profession Im really into, also would like to get to know Canadian culture as well as improve my English.
    Hope thats comprehensive.

    2.Actually, i dropped physics and chemistry before senior years. Actually, we had to drop some classes, and chemistry and physics were the ones i dropped.
    Having a B in English, Biology, and Math on the other hand will be no problem...
    So what? What to do here? Are those classes i dont have anymore required on every university over there?
    Or are there courses i could do quickly before? If you know anything more about it, please tell me!

    however, im very thankful for your help so far!!

    P.S.: If theres no chance of studying Physio in Canada without those required physics and chemistry courses, is it possible to do so wothout them in any other of the countries with good physio education you listed? What about Australia or New Zealand, actually? ( As youre from over there )

    Thanks in advance,

    Jonas from Germany


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    Re: Studying PT in Canada, as a German

    Hi Jonas,
    point 1: The German Physio degree is a baseline Bachelor that is not yet internationally recognised/ accepted. The degrees I am talking about are Honours degrees. These teach e.g. autonomous practice (=direct access, diagnostics, etc.). As far as I am aware this is still not accepted in Germany. That's where I was coming from. But you are right - they could be accepted in Germany. Is it still the case, that Germany does not have nationwide regulation, but that you have to apply for registration in the federal state, e.g. Bavaria, that you want to work in? And that this registration might not be accepted in another state?

    Point 2: I can understand your line of thinking now. It's excellent that you already know exactly where you want to end up, but to study Medicine takes a long long time - until you are actually in the position to work specifically in Sports Medicine. I am not sure that prolonging that process by doing a Physio degree first will aid your path or make you a better professional afterwards. I don't know what you mean by "waiting time" and having better chances at a place to study? What do you mean by having to bridge the gap. Why can you not get a place at uni after graduation?
    Anyway: To me this all sounds as if you haven't made up your mind yet as to whether you want to be a Physio or a Medic. They are two very different professions and will address different areas of treatment. Both of which will be holistic in their own ways. And both will treat Sports Injuries in very different ways. And then - if you want to live in Canada, why don't you apply to study Medicine there?
    I presume that you know that Orthopaedics only covers one of the three main clinical aspects of a Physio degree and in Medical, it's even less.

    As to titles: I know that Germany has mixed it all up a little. In the English speaking world it looks like this:
    1) Basic degree - Bachelor (Honours programme; 3 or 4 years full time)
    2) Additional degree: Masters (usually 2 years if you're good ); you can only enter a Master's programme if you have a Bachelors degree;
    • Master of Physiotherapy: this is done by students of a degree relating to health who want to become Physiotherapists (e.g. if you've got a Bachelor of Sports and Exercise Science)
    • Master of Sports Physio/ Neurology/ Manual Therapy etc.: these are master programmes that are done by students with a BSc/ Physio who wish to specialise in a certain area of Physiotherapy; that's often done part time
    • Or you do only part of the papers and finish early: with those credits you might qualify you for a certificate or diploma.

    3) PhD: well that's your doctorate study; length of that depends on your project and your ability to commit (e.g. if you get paid for it or not)

    All of these, at least here Down Under, will mainly increase your knowledge and hopefully employability (esp. if you aspire to teach at uni), not so much wages. Most of the Physios will have done their postgrad education through high quality courses and their wages are the same.

    Lastly: the information about the school subject levels comes from the websites I cited. If I were you, I would write to them and ask directly.
    In NZ - difficult to say; I don't know how to compare your Abitur to NCEA. There is some explanations on the website of AUT/ Auckland University of Technology - but it's too complicated. Looks like you need to have your qualification assessed (sounds like overall at least 3 A levels and the rest at least C; but no guarantees for that). And again: your are looking at NZ$120.000 just for studying. It fascinates me that you would even consider it. I know how much the Germans here struggle just to pay for the one year they have to do to get their registration (not even considering passing their exams).

    Cheers,
    Fyzzio



 
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